The CyClone Dairy Hoax leads to “Food & Water Watch”

March 27, 2009 by  

Having already concluded that CyClone Dairy – a dairy that supposedly gets its milk from cloned cows – is a hoax, I was a bit flummoxed on how to find the anonymous hoaxers who were behind it. Luckily, a commenter on a DailyKos dairy seemed to unlock the secret. Here’s what Addison discovered:

Check out “Linda” here as compared with Claudia here and here.

The photos Addison linked to are:

Linda

“Linda” at CyClone Dairy.

Claudia

“Claudia” at Food and Water Watch

Claudia

“Claudia” at Food and Water Watch.

Clearly this is the same person, used in the same role on both sites. Addison also added that Food & Water Watch is in the middle of a “Know your milk” campaign.

Adding to the circumstantial evidence is the fact that Food & Water Watch are strongly opposed to cloned animals.

It is their interest in cloning technology that truly makes this recent blog post stand out, as writer SofiaB reacts to this remarkable new dairy (the site went on line in Jan. 2009) with absolutely no skepticism whatsoever:

You’ve got to hand it to the CyClone Dairy people. They’ve decided that, rather than hide the fact that they use milk from cloned animals and their offspring, they’ll brag about it instead and hope that people assume that their positive attitude comes from a product that’s been proven “safe.” Unfortunately, the reality is quite the opposite of the website’s cheerful photos and catchy slogans.

More circumstantial evidence from the above blog post: SofiaB’s post is the first to mention CyClone Dairy. First, period. There’s not a word about “CyClone Dairy” prior to that March 19 post. And, the two videos for CyClone Dairy on YouTube were both posted just four days ago.

While circumstantial evidence doesn’t prove anything on its own, a lot of circumstantial evidence usually gives one a good idea. I have made a couple phone calls to Food & Water Watch and sent an e-mail to them, as well. I hope to hear from them, especially if they have a denial (which thus far is apparently their stance.)

But unless that happens, my final conclusion on the matter is thus: CyClone Dairy is an invention of Food and Water Watch. There is no CyClone Dairy, and Food and Water Watch are using the site and the ads to drum up interest in the currently non-existent debate about using cloned animals in the food supply.

See update with Ben & Jerry’s info here.

–WKW

Comments

19 Responses to “The CyClone Dairy Hoax leads to “Food & Water Watch””

  1. William K. Wolfrum Chronicles » Blog Archive » CyClone Dairy a hoax now unfolding; but to what purpose? on March 27th, 2009 4:08 pm

    [...] See the update to this post here. [...]

  2. dgun on March 27th, 2009 4:11 pm

    Busted. lol.

  3. Vance on March 27th, 2009 4:35 pm

    William – Good sleuthing. I came to the same conclusion for the same reasons (though I didn’t have those two photos to go on). But here’s the thing. I called them this afternoon in my capacity as a reporter for a major metropolitan newspaper and asked them point-blank to confirm or deny that the site was theirs. They denied it completely. So now what?

  4. William K. Wolfrum on March 27th, 2009 4:44 pm

    Thanks, Vance.

    That’s interesting and strange about their denial. I hope they contact me via e-mail or this site to give a denial.

    The thing is, it’s gotten pretty tough to believe it’s not them. That post by SofiaB really is a big piece of evidence. Because she wouldn’t have had one word on “CyClone Dairy” to go by on the Internet. No one mentioned it before her. And right after she mentioned it, the ads started coming.

    We’ll see. I remain quite confident, and now knowing you researched it and came to the same conclusions, I’m even more confident. I suppose we’ll see what happens with this.

  5. William K. Wolfrum on March 27th, 2009 4:46 pm

    Also, notice how high my stories are in a Google search of CyClone Dairy. This site just isn’t THAT popular to go right to the top of a search.

    Something like this should have been getting A TON of attention for quite some time, but it received none. Until Food and Water Watch wrote about it.

  6. Cyclone Dairy « A Politics of Nature on March 27th, 2009 5:59 pm

    [...] 28, 2009 Cyclone Dairy Posted by jamonhalvaksz under Uncategorized | Tags: cloning, GMO |   Nice catch on whosebehind these cyclone dairy adds…   [...]

  7. owlbear1 on March 28th, 2009 4:37 am

    Well, now that they’ve gotten some attention they should put out a video game. Ooh better yet a sci-fi horror movie. HiVeCoWs: Cloned just a little ToOO well!

  8. dgun on March 28th, 2009 1:54 pm

    wonder cow should really be notified of this situation.

    * dusts off hero costume *

  9. Oregon Gal on March 29th, 2009 7:59 am

    I linked onto the site from a DailyKos ad and spent a lot of fried brain cells trying to figure out if it was real or not…. and I’m a dairy producer….

    The thing that flummoxed me is that it’s so similar to what is being done with goats in the production of goats thru GM that produce cancer drugs in their milk. I do think this is coming, the question is just how soon.

    My answer in the past would be to move somewhere you could have your own goat but the government is trying to make that almost impossible thru implementation of a horrible, expensive and cumbersome animal tracking system called NAIS that will be forcibly imposed even on families wanting to raise a few chickens or one lamb or pony for a 4H project. Or yes, even one family milk goat… you’ll have to own equipment to install and read chips in your animals that will be capable of being tracked by satellites. Sound awful? It is.

  10. William K. Wolfrum on March 29th, 2009 9:00 am

    Thanks for making your points, Oregon Gal. I hope that this issue does get debated more. But detecting that CyClone Dairy is a fake shouldn’t take more than a third of a brain cell and shouldn’t take more than a couple minutes. For someone in the dairy industry, it should have taken milli-seconds to see it’s fake. So I’m sort of feeling that you’re astroturfing me.

    I agree with some other comments that this PR Campaign should have been made more comical. As of now, it’s like FWW is just trying to put one over on people, rather than including them in on the joke and taking the debate from there. Honest discussion beats the hell out of hoaxing people.

    P.S.: I’m all for anyone commenting on the issue of cloned animals here, but try not to insult my intelligence by pretending that CyClone Dairy is somehow real. It’s not.

  11. Scott Rogers on March 29th, 2009 12:47 pm

    The Cyclone Dairy isn’t a fake, it’s obviously educational satire.

    Sheesh, next you will be showing how clever you are by debunking Jonathan Swift’s Modest Proposal, or proving that Mark Twain is a fake since his real name is Samual Clemens.

  12. William K. Wolfrum Chronicles » Blog Archive » April Fools - a final thought on CyClone Dairy on March 29th, 2009 5:57 pm

    [...] Over at Fair Food Fight, El Dragón has some very good points about the CyClone Dairy hoax. It would have been far better to have construct a campaign that allowed people in on the joke immediately, to engage people in a way that would have allowed them to feel “in on the joke” and to inspire them to spread the word virally to others who might enjoy the joke, too. [...]

  13. amy thomson on March 30th, 2009 9:58 am

    It’s a really GOOD fake. Speaking as an agriculture major, I have to say that milk from cloned cows really isn’t different from regular cows. Frankly it’s far less risky than Bovine Growth Hormone. For me the big issue is that it would reduce the genetic variability of the dairy herd, and therefore its ability to react to a new disease or pest.

    My big problem with Big Dairy is the fact that they have bred dairy cows for production at the cost of the animals health. Most cows give seventy pounds of milk PER milking (that’s seventy pounds TWICE a day! Ouch.

  14. Joe Blow on March 30th, 2009 12:02 pm

    There is a certain large socially conscious company involved that will make sense once it comes out.

  15. Than Angell on March 30th, 2009 3:59 pm

    My question is, when is someone going to run with all this great PR and actually create this CyClone dairy? I’m not afraid of GM, so where can I get some GFP milk?

  16. Mike Stein on March 30th, 2009 9:24 pm

    Our organization has been in the vanguard of the fight to stop the incursion of cloned food into our food supply. Our label will identify meat and dairy products that have NOT been derived from cloned animals or their offspring. The Wall Street Journal reported in its Septenber 2, 2008 issue that “milk and meat from the offspring of cloned livestock are entering the U.S. food supply.” The Journal states that the “number of clones is on the rise, and no one is keeping track of all their offspring.” Numerous public opinion polls have shown that up to 71% of Americans do not want to purchase food derived from cloned animals. America must wake up to this issue before it is too late.

  17. hmmmdonuts on March 31st, 2009 11:52 am

    Educational Satire? Try scare-tactic marketing. It is the creation of Ben & Jerry’s and will be revealed tomorrow as an April Fools joke. Really funny, B&J, making up a company to try to scare people into believing that your organic ice cream is better than what the rest of the world is eating.

    Milk is milk, folks.

  18. William K. Wolfrum on March 31st, 2009 12:12 pm

    Try scare-tactic marketing.

    Well put. I update this story with the Ben & Jerry’s connection here, btw.

  19. Food Pills of the Future » Blog Archive » 20 Bucks Says CyCloneDairy… on April 1st, 2009 5:28 am

    [...] Update: Looks like I could be wrong.  Cyclone Dairy may have been unmasked. Guess I give the organic dairy peeps too much credit. [...]

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